Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) iPhone 6 launched last Friday had drawn the world’s attention to its release and both the press and the public could not resist from showing its affection for the brand and impatience for getting a unit of the same. However, things changed drastically within days, and this Wednesday we could see that people were coming up with complaints about the new Apple device.

Many issues in just few days

The new update to the operating system did not go as per the company’s expectations and caused many issues such as the cellular service was disabled and the users could not gain access to the Touch ID fingerprint scanner. This sparked a revolt and the results were evident on Twitter. Another issue is that of bending iPhone 6 Plus models.

Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has informed that the software issues are being taken care of for a timely resolution. At present, the issue with Apple is that its new device had created much hype long before its release and the big screen rumors had already worked their trick on Android users, who wanted an Apple phone but didn’t buy due to small screen. Even the new software update was said to boast of some new features and applications that were bound to woo the customers. This had set high expectations for not only the ardent Apple fans, but also others. So, when unfulfilled these led to a state of utter dismay and left customers frenzied.

Not much effect on stock

The above issues with the hardware and software did not affect the stock much and only a slight decline in shares was noticed. There has not been any effect on the sales even and the devices are sold at record rates.

Twitter has become a portal, where people actively share their experiences with any new product or service and it quickly gets escalated. Such incidents don’t seem to have much effect on the major brands and companies. The practice of criticizing a new Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) product has been there since long

“Apple compared to anyone else has a flawless track record in product, and that just raises the bar to catch them on something,” says Gene Munster, an analyst at Piper Jaffray. “It has become a game with these releases: Who can find the first problem?”