Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) is surely up for launch in Australian market in 2015 as informed by joint head of Village Roadshow, Graham Burke. Village Roadshow is a film distributor and production company that has made some remarkable movies such as ‘The Matrix Trilogy’ and ‘The Great Gatsby’. The co-CEO of the company has informed that Netflix will soon enter the Australian market.

Services might be costlier

Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) had initiated a talk with the Village Roadshow, where it discussed with them over the supply of products. Josh Taylor of ZDNet was informed by Graham Burke that this is an indicator of them making their presence in Australia. No mention of the timing was made, but reports from another interview given to CNET he said that next year the launch in Australia might take place going by what the majority thinks.

The current monthly fee charged by Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) is US$7.99 and for the Australian subscribers it could be even higher once it is launched in Australia.

Growing popularity of Netflix among Aussies

Netflix’s Australian version has generated a lot of rumors from past several months. The service of Netflix is hugely popular among the Australians and they even resort to getting around geo-blocks for gaining access to those. This indicated a good market for the company as well as growth opportunities. This might have led Netflix to open the services for local Australian audiences as well, as informed by The Australian.

Australian fans of Netflix, Inc. (NASDAQ:NFLX) have been gaining access to its services from U.S. using a VPN, owing to the huge popularity and demand. In a quasi legal state, the practice of gaining access to content delivery services by getting around geo-blocks does exist.

If any user tries to access the site by breaching the terms of use then it would be considered a crime, as informed by Matt Philips, IT lawyer for IDEALAW, to ZDNet. Philips added that streaming of the content does not count as violation of copyright law in Australia.

Screen Launch, an Australian film group has compared the practice of watching international sites with watching Bittorent movies, and hence is considered similar to piracy. Advice on setting up the VPNs and using them for watching international movies has been recommended by the consumer watchdog Choice.