A Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) Glass user was questioned by the officials of the Department of Homeland security suspecting him to illegally record the movie at a theater using the glass. This is not the first time the much hyped device from Google has raised privacy concerns over its use.

Glasses carried prescription lens

Spokesman from Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) said that no such kind activity was performed by the user. Motion Picture Association works in close collaboration with theaters in the United State to keep a check on camcording and “theatre-generated piracy.”

Interrogation was confirmed by the DHS Immigration and Customs Enforcement, who said that the recording device that the agents thought is being used to record the movies, was actually a part of prescription eye glasses in which the recording feature was inactive.

The user said that he went to watch a movie with his wife in AMC theatre in Easton Mall in Columbus, Ohio, on Saturday.  He said that to avoid any sort of distraction during the movie he turned off the glass, but had to wear it as these have his prescription lenses also. The authorities probed the whole case, but, after determining that the user has not recorded any illegal content, he was released.

AMC theatres published on Twitter “it is true that a guest with a potential recording device inside the auditorium was questioned at our AMC Easton 30.” The theatre had contacted MPAA investigators and later referred the issue to the DHS, says a report from PCWorld citing a source. There was no comment from Google over the issue.

Google Glass and legal issues

A spokesman of the MPAA said that Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) Glass is a phenomenal innovation in the mobile sphere, and there has not been any such case that questions the security threat over the content theft.

Google glass users have fallen more than one time in the legal brawl. Earlier this month, a Southern California court dismissed traffic violation issue for wearing Google Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) Glass while driving. Initially the driver was stopped and issued a ticket for speeding then a second ticket was issued after the California Highway Patrol officer noticed that the driver was wearing Google Glass.

According to the reports, the case was dismissed by the court commissioner as no proof that the device was in operation at the time was found.